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Class Information

Below are the date, time, location, and outline for this class.

It Is Not Meet That Children Should Be Compelled in All Things

Taught by Timothy Rarick

Sessions

Day Time Location
Saturday, August 3 1 p.m. Smith 240
Tim Rarick

Tim Rarick

Biography

Tim Rarick is a faculty member in the Department of Home and Family at BYU-Idaho. He has taught courses at Kansas State University and BYU-Idaho such as Lifespan Human Development, Parent Education, and Child and Family Advocacy to name a few. Rarick has conducted research studies with emerging adults (18-25 year olds) regarding their life-goal pursuits, subjective wellbeing, and views on marriage and family.

Tim also serves on the Advisory Board for United Families International—a pro-family organization that promotes the traditional family through public policy and research. He has spoken at conferences in China and the United States regarding children and families. Rarick earned a master's and doctorate degree in Marriage, Family, & Human Development from Kansas State University.

Tim and his wife, Jodi, have been married for 13 years and have one son and three daughters. He enjoys playing basketball, tennis, and the guitar as often as occasion permits, which is rarely.

Class Outline

Using rewards and punishments with our children is a short-term solution to compel them to act in ways that are desirable. However, employing patience and teaching truth, treating our children as agents and not objects, combined with the power of empathy will help our children become what they came here to become. Children are more than just a series of desirable and undesirable behaviors. This class will focus on research and doctrinally based principles to help parents keep this long-term perspective while avoiding traditional pitfalls and misconceptions in discipline.